Friday, January 25, 2013

Peter Pan: Diamond Edition Blu-ray Review

Walt Disney's fourteenth feature, Peter Pan, is coming to Blu-ray for the first time on February 5, exactly sixty years to the day it was released in theatres by RKO Pictures on February 5, 1953.

I must admit that Peter Pan has never been a personal favourite: too frenetic and loud, with none of the magic of Alice in Wonderland and Cinderella, the two classics that precede it in the Disney canon. I'm sure many will disagree.

Still, it's not hard to see why the film has become the most recognizable adaptation of Sir J. M. Barrie's most famous work. The character design and animation on Peter and villainous Captain Hook is superb, as is the effects animation on Tinker Bell.

It all looks better than ever in high definition, of course. Every frame looks like it was inked-and-painted last week. The Blu-ray also features a fresh DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 mix—but you know I went with the original mono. The menus look great, too.

With this Diamond Edition release, Disney continues their efforts to push interactivity, adding features like Disney Intermission, which brings up animated activities when your kids unnecessarily pause the movie.

As for extras, there isn't much that's new; mainly a 40-minute documentary, Growing Up with Nine Old Men. It's a fly-on-the-wall look at director Theodore Thomas, son of Disney animator Frank Thomas, as he visits some of the children of the other Nine Old Men.

The Peter Pan: Diamond Edition will go on sale in 3-disc and and 2-disc combo packs that include the film on DVD, the 3-disc adding a digital copy and Storybook App. (Note: Cover of the 3-disc is slightly altered in its final form, adding a barely noticeable Tinker Bell.)

For a more technical look at the release, head over to Blu-ray.com, an excellent resource for such things. Their review has an interesting discussion on Disney's restoration work on the film and other classic titles.

1 comment:

Jordan said...

I love Blu-ray.com! They're a great review site. Kenneth Brown seems to do most of the animated film Blu-ray reviews.