Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Gary Rydstrom Directing Animated Feature at Lucasfilm

Speaking with Animation Magazine, Brenda Chapman let it slip that Gary Rydstrom, veteran sound designer at Skywalker Sound and director of two Pixar shorts (and one cancelled feature) is directing an animated feature for Disney-owned Lucasfilm.

The unannounced picture—likely the one we heard about in 2010—is the one Chapman was consulting on after leaving Pixar following her removal as sole director of Brave. Naturally, there's no word on story or casting yet.

As an aside, Chapman is now at DreamWorks Animation, where she's developing a film that is "very different than Brave, but yet has a strong female protagonist." She continues to burn her bridges to Pixar, telling the magazine, "I have no desire to go back there. The atmosphere and the leadership doesn’t fit well with me."

You can read the entire interview with Chapman here.

9 comments:

Alexandro Fantino said...

Yeah, go ruin projects at DreamWorks Animation with your "strong female protagonist" talents, Chapman. They won't mind.

It really gets on my nerves how feministic she is.

I'm looking forward to Rydstrom's film, by the way. Hope some of Newt instills into it.

Tyler (AmishParadise27) said...

Brenda Chapman is dissing on Pixar? Damn...

Anonymous said...

haha. Get over yourself Alexandro. Women can be heroes too.

Chris Etrata said...

Is Brenda Chapman dissing pixar an indication that PIxar is changing for the worse? Previously, no one at pixar wanted to ever leave.

@ Alexandro Mark Andrews took over the project which makes me wonder what would happen if Brenda Chapman remained on as director.

Jordan said...

Am I the only one who sympathizes with what Brenda Chapman did? She and Lauren Faust - along with whomever created the American Girl dolls/characters - have seen their special girl-empowering characters (Merida and the G4 ponies) manipulated in ways that they disagree with due to corporate decisions. The difference being Brenda has a bit more speaking freedom than Lauren, and from my 3DS, I don't know who created the American Girls line.

Anonymous said...

Brenda must have refused a co-director...Pixar always tries to place directors who are struggling with a co-director and it was definitely a man. She probably did not like that and decided to leave Pixar. Unfortunately, Pixar owned her ideas by that point I'm certain so it left a bitter taste in her mouth. I wonder how much Lasseter listens to the Brain Trust because he does have final say on these decisions....

Anonymous said...

Brenda goes from Disney to Dreamworks to Pixar back to Dreamworks again. I must say though, it's really sad that Pixar is changing for the worse. I think her words are indicative of what Pixar has become.

Alexandro Fantino said...

@1st Anon: I know women can be heroes, and I love watching movies with female heroes, but the way Chapman talks about heroines is what really bothers me.

Have you read The Art of Brave? It's packed with her insufferable quotes on how she managed to endure through the male empire at Pixar by making use of her super female abilities which eventually lead to her glorious success. I mean, the girl just got replaced like any other director who doesn't work, but she's been insisting on making it a matter of gender like that was the main reason.

Don't get me wrong. I'm not misogynistic or anything but I really oppose to the belief that one gender is better than the other. They complement each other. That's all.

Anonymous said...

How can any of you hate on Chapman.

She spent 6 years of her life passionately creating something she believed in. She TRUSTED Pixar to be the "director driven studio that doesn't have executive meddling" that Lasseter always spews in PR material.

Well, guess what. They didn't care about her or her project. They didn't like what they made, so they pulled her off the project and altered it so it could be mass appeal to both genders, and so it could sell more toys.

Pixar doesn't care about films anymore. They care about making two toy commercials a year.

I hate feminism propaganda as much as the next person, but what's wrong with making a film with a strong female protagonist that appeals mainly to women and girls? Are they not allow to have something aimed at them, especially in a world filled with male driven power fantasies?